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Lazyness prevails

http://www.coffee-channel.com/2012/06/chemex-first-look.html

I love my Chemex.

Most people consider drip coffee much less cool than steam coffee. Most of them also seem to prefer milkshakes to coffee.

On the other hand, drip coffee has been wronged so much by the average home coffee machine, even more by 20 litre catering buckets and don't get me started on the typical office coffee. Coffee from most drip machines varies between "barely drinkable" and "battery acid" (preferably drunk out of thin plastic cups – the definition of anti coffee). The reason for this is however not the brew technique. As I learned from Marco Arment: keeping coffee heated after brewing makes it sour and bitter. But I digress. If you like a good drip coffee, the Chemex is wonderful, and neither does it need high voltage nor water or waste water connections.

Of course there is a catch with this ennobled-by-the-Museum-of-Modern-Art design masterpiece: if you leave a rest on the bottom, it stains and the felt atmosphere in the thing changes, and not to the better (yes, we just entered the eight circle of mysticism). So I like to keep that thing clean. Put the rest of the coffee in the sink, rinse with a little water, rinse again, put upside down so no water rest on the bottom goes moldy over the day.

I should note that we have twins and a small kitchen, so we need our kitchen to be action-ready all the time.

And this is where I recently caught myself doing more than I need to do. Here is before:

  • put coffee in cups
  • put Chemex aside
  • drink coffee

Later:

  • take Chemex
  • rinse Chemex
  • put away Chemex

And then, some weeks ago, one morning like all the others, it hit me like the proverbial piano on the head: if I keep the Chemex in my hand after filling the cups, and immediately rinse it and put it away… I mean… WHOOAAAAA!

So the new version is:

  • put coffee in cups
  • rinse Chemex
  • put away Chemex
  • drink coffee

Not only is that less tasks than before – a lazyfest if there ever was one. It's also peace of mind.

Not finishing something keeps you in an open loop and in todo-debt. It also creates another task of having to pick it up again. And suddenly we are knee deep in the swamps of procrastination, productivity and resistance.

Most people at least pretend to have checked that since their diaper days. Tidy up immedeately, no worries. Me, I didn't. Never really. Until that morning.

Recommended further reading: Human Task Switches Considered Harmful.